Planting the Seeds for Recovery in Puerto Rico

 

Full Article from CityandstateNY.com can be found here: Planting the seeds of recovery in Puerto Rico through reforestation, sustainable farming

Saving Puerto Rico with Seeds

Click photo to be taken to the article.

 

Before and After Maria Aerial Views

Puerto Ricans on the Heartbreak of Leaving Post-Maria: “I feel like I’m being kicked out of my home”

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Puerto Rican Illustrator Rosa Colón on Her Ode to Leaving Home, ‘Goodbye for Now’

This is a amazing interview with Illustrator and co-owner of Soda Pop Comics here in Puerto Rico. Here they discuss the exodus of many brilliant and creative young professionals before and after hurricane Maria, a must read.

Read full article here

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Please Read, this is what Puerto Rico is facing.

112 Degrees With No Water: Puerto Rican Hospitals Battle Life And Death Daily

Private groups and individuals are flying out to Puerto Rico as I speak to help with the relief effort’s, there are some truly amazing people out there. I’ve been told there are 10,000 troops here already.

As of today we have yet to see any groups handing out water, food or supplies. That doesn’t mean it hasn’t been done it just means where we live, those items aren’t available to us or they are in a location not broadcasted.

We’ve gone out twice to FEMA locations that were reported on the radio and when we arrived there was no one. We still have to search for very long hours and stand in very long lines to purchase water IF it is available.

As I’ve said before we are one of the lucky ones in that we live close to the metro area and all the roads are cleared. So imagine how the remote areas are faring, it must be incredibly frustrating and feel hopeless.

If there’s one thing I would ask of those on the mainland, is to contact your Congressman, contact whomever you think would be able to help, tell them that we need more people here…we need many, many more people here helping.

Workers here are overextended, hospital staff/police/military are exhausted and overworked. We need people to replenish these workers so that they aren’t overextended.

Supplies are not getting to Puerto Rico residents as desperately needed, we need more truck drivers, we need more helicopters, we need more pilots, we just need more.

Thank you…

Gorgeous Collection of Vintage Photographs from the 1940s-1960s

Friends of Eldo Neufeld (photographer) outside rural home. Taken 1946-48.
Friends of Eldo Neufeld (photographer) outside rural home. Taken 1946-48.

Whilst doing some research one night I stumbled upon this amazing flickr account run by Tom Lehman. Amazing because Mr. Lehman collected thousands of vintage slides, cleaned, scanned, edited, identified and attributed each one to their individual photographer. And after that monumental task was completed, he was kind enough to upload them for everyone to see, enjoy and use free of charge. (As long as it’s not for monetary gain)

Most of the photos are of Puerto Rico but there are some other countries among the collection as well. He also has a blog which explains why and how these photographs came to light.

Another useful site is “Archivo Historico y Fotografico de Puerto Rico” which has many fascinating photographs and ephemera as well. Stop by and check them out, as you can see from the examples here, they are really quite remarkable.

The photos I picked to showcase here are just a small sampling and most have been edited to some degree. I hope you will stop by Tom’s site to view the rest and perhaps give him a hand with the identification process.

burning sugar cane
Burning Sugar Cane Field – !960 Taken by Elmer Weaver
Cayey in Toita - apr 60 Puerto Ricotwo
Iglesia Bautista in Toita, Cayey, PR. 1960 – Taken by Elmer Weaver (Still standing, you can see an image on Google Maps)
Political Party Club - 1960 (City Unknown)
Political Party Club – 1960 (City Unknown) Taken by Elmer Weaver.
DeSoto at Kofresi Line Inc., Ponce-San Juan. Between 1948 -1951.
DeSoto at Kofresi Line Inc., Ponce-San Juan. Between 1948 -1951. Taken by John Brandeberry
Funeral Coach 1948
Funeral Coach 1948 – Taken by Esther Rinner
Fisherman in Arroyo - April 1948
Fisherman in Arroyo – April 1948 – Taken by Esther Rinner
Oxen taking water to steam engine .1947-48 - Taken by Esther Rinner
Oxen taking water to steam engine .1947-48 – Taken by Esther Rinner
Between Comerio and Barranquitas. 1960-61
Between Comerio and Barranquitas. 1960-61 Taken by Patricia Santiago.
"Little girl that brought us oranges" - March 1948. Photo by Dale Roesch
“Little girl that brought us oranges” – March 1948. Photo by Dale Roesch
Fotographia Nunez, booth in Lares plaza. July 10, 1955 Taken by Lee Smith
Fotographia Nunez, booth in Lares plaza. July 10, 1955 – Taken by Lee Smith
Rio Piedras street scene - January 1960 - Taken by Elmer Weaver
Rio Piedras street scene – January 1960 Taken by Elmer Weaver

Ferinart – Feria Internacional de Artesania May 8-14th

Artisans from Puerto Rico and all over the world come together to exhibit high quality and hand crafted wares. It only comes around once a year so come check out the best of the best under one (air conditioned) roof!  May 8-14th in Guaynabo, PR. Click on the banner for further information.

 

Big Changes in the Arecibo District

We’ve had our noses to the grindstone for a quite awhile and decided on a recent holiday weekend we simply had to break the cycle. We headed along the northern coast through Vega Baja, Manati, and Barceloneta, finally ending up in Arecibo.

Near La Boca in Barceloneta we could already see major changes either completed or under way. The public space, El Malecon had been completely re-imagined with a busy new adjacent restaurant, El Bohio del Gran Pescador. Like all new restaurants in Puerto Rico, the line was at least 50 people deep. Further down, another well known restaurant was reaping the rewards of the area’s revitalization. What once was a near ghost town was now flush with hoards of patrons.

We had only driven a third of the distance to the “Birth of the New World Statue” and things were already drastically different. As we meandered in what was now stop and go traffic you could see modern road-side stands, re-opened businesses, the promise of pasteles off a side street, coco frio on every corner and 100’s of families enjoying the playa. It had only been three months since we were last here, with so much progress in such a short time, it was astounding.

stand

About a 1/2 mile before Cueva del Indio we spotted a new restaurant on the left, Camaleón Bar & Grill, busy but not insanely so. Directly across the street is the “Gasolina Beach Club“, a large lot with shade trees, a large clearing for helicopter tours* (we took the helicopter tour and had a blast) and a restaurant in the back. They frequently have concerts and various entertainment events as well. The restaurant is two storied with a wide veranda over-looking the playa. The views are gorgeous, it’s the perfect place to grab a plate of fried guilty pleasures and an ice cold beer.

sign

porch

I should mention at this point most of this progress is funded by Pan American Grain, for better or worse, depending of what side of the issue you are on. If you didn’t know, Pan American Grain’s products are ubiquitous throughout the island. Brands such as Rico rice, Gasolina and Mami cafe. They are the financial backer of “Terra Vista Parkland” and all that encompasses, including the previously mentioned restaurant, beach club and tours. “Terra Vista Parkland” will be a developed park surrounding the Columbus statue. To view the park’s future plans check out their video.

helicopter

view 3

view 4

While in the area, we noticed Cueva del Indio’s original paid parking lot was corded off (temporarily?) and a much larger adjacent lot was available. We aren’t entirely sure Pan American had anything to do with it, but it had their stamp on it with similar decor and landscaping.

I’m not sure how I feel about the project itself. On one hand it’s an obvious financial benefit to locals in the surrounding area. I can see traffic becoming a nightmare but there are also plans to widen the road. Widen it how is yet to be seen, PR’s back roads don’t leave much wiggle room. There are groups protesting the development and a petition going around. From what I have read they are keeping the environment in mind, but will they truly? It’s not like corporations haven’t broken promises in the past. If you have any further info on the subject or just want to share your perspective, let me know in the comments, I would love to hear from you.

statue far viiew

*Helicopter tours are $35pp but you need 3 people for that price. If you are a couple or going solo you have the option of waiting for additional people to show up (who will also agree to ride with you) or you can pay for the empty seat(s). We opted to pay for the third empty seat. Bonus short video of our flight.

Must Read (and share!) Article by Nelson Denis

After a Century of American Citizenship, Puerto Ricans Have Little to Show for It

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